Serdar Yegulalp

About the Author Serdar Yegulalp


Gluon brings AI developers self-tuning machine learning

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What is Grafeas? Better auditing for containers

The software we run has never been more difficult to vouchsafe than it is today. It is scattered between local deployments and cloud services, built with open source components that aren’t always a known quantity, and delivered on a fast-moving schedule, making it a challenge to guarantee safety or quality.

The end result is software that is hard to audit, reason about, secure, and manage. It is difficult not just to know what a VM or container was built with, but what has been added or removed or changed and by whom. Grafeas, originally devised by Google, is intended to make these questions easier to answer.

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What’s new in Kubernetes 1.8: role-based access, for starters

The latest version of the open source container orchestration framework Kubernetes, Kubernetes 1.8, promotes some long-gestating, long-awaited features to beta or even full production release. And it adds more alpha and beta features as well.

The new additions and promotions:

  • Role-based security features.
  • Expanded auditing and logging functions.
  • New and improved ways to run both interactive and batch workloads.
  • Many new alpha-level features, designed to become full-blown additions over the next couple of releases.

Kubernetes 1.8’s new security features

Earlier versions of Kubernetes introduced role-based access control (RBAC) as a beta feature. RBAC lets an admin define access permissions to Kubernetes resources, such as pods or secrets, and then grant (“bind”) them to one or more users. Permissions can be for changing things (“create”, “update”, “patch”) or just obtaining information about them (“get”, “list”, “watch”). Roles can be applied on a single namespace or across an entire cluster, via two distinct APIs.

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What’s new in MySQL 8.0

MySQL, the popular open-source database that’s a standard element in many web application stacks, has unveiled the first release candidate for version 8.0.

Features to be rolled out in MySQL 8.0 include:

  • First-class support for Unicode 9.0 out of the box.
  • Window functions and recursive SQL syntax, for queries that previously weren’t possible or would have been difficult to write.
  • Expanded support for native JSON data and document-store functionality.

With version 8.0, MySQL is jumping several versions in its numbering (from 5.5), due to 6.0 being nixed and 7.0 being reserved for the clustering version of MySQL.

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Cython 0.27 speeds Python by moving away from oddball syntax

Cython, the toolkit that allows Python code to be converted to high-speed C code, has a new 0.27 release that can now use Python’s own native typing syntax to speed up the Python-to-C conversion process.

Previously, Cython users could accelerate Python only by decorating the code with type annotations in a dialect peculiar to Cython. Python has its own optional syntax for variable type annotation, but Cython didn’t use it.

With Cython 0.27, Cython can now recognize PEP 526-style type declarations for native Python types, such as str or list. The same syntax can also be used to explicitly define native C types, using declarations like var: cython.int = 32.

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ONNX makes machine learning models portable, shareable

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13 frameworks for mastering machine learning

13 frameworks for mastering machine learning
13 frameworks for mastering machine learning

Image by W.Rebel via Wikimedia

Over the past year, machine learning has gone mainstream with a bang. The “sudden” arrival of machine learning isn’t fueled by cheap cloud environments and ever more powerful GPU hardware alone. It is also due to an explosion of open source frameworks designed to abstract away the hardest parts of machine learning and make its techniques available to a broad class of developers.

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IBM speeds deep learning by using multiple servers

For everyone frustrated by how long it takes to train deep learning models, IBM has some good news: It has unveiled a way to automatically split deep-learning training jobs across multiple physical servers — not just individual GPUs, but whole systems with their own separate sets of GPUs.

Now the bad news: It’s available only in IBM’s PowerAI 4.0 software package, which runs exclusively on IBM’s own OpenPower hardware systems.

Distributed Deep Learning (DDL) doesn’t require developers to learn an entirely new deep learning framework. It repackages several common frameworks for machine learning: TensorFlow, Torch, Caffe, Chainer, and Theano. Deep learning projecs that use those frameworks can then run in parallel across multiple hardware nodes.

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Apache Spark 2.2 gets streaming, R language boosts

With version 2.2 of Apache Spark, a long-awaited feature for the multipurpose in-memory data processing framework is now available for production use.

Structured Streaming, as that feature is called, allows Spark to process streams of data in ways that are native to Spark’s batch-based data-handling metaphors. It’s part of Spark’s long-term push to become, if not all things to all people in data science, then at least the best thing for most of them.

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How Heptio plans to automate away Kubernetes setup pains

Heptio, the commercial Kubernetes outfit founded by two creators of that microservices management framework, has unveiled its first public project for making Kubernetes easier to deploy in the enterprise.

Kubernetes simplifies how apps run as microservices, but setting up Kubernetes itself is no picnic. Heptio’s project automates some of the fiddlier parts of the setup process via a custom, domain-specific language.

Heptio’s project, dubbed Ksonnet, is an open source tool set for assembling the configuration needed to deploy Kubernetes. The most common setup difficulties in Kubernetes involve creating the configuration files, what Heptio calls the “wall of YAML” problem.

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Atom editor now has native GitHub integration

GitHub’s Atom, the Node.js- and HTML5-powered code editor, has traditionally integrated with Git repositories—including GitHub itself—only by way of third-party components.

All that changed this week with the unveiling of a new core package for Atom, called appropriately enough GitHub for Atom, along with new release and beta editions of Atom itself.

GitHub users, dock here

The new edition of Atom, version 1.17, introduces a new UI component called “docks,” which is a way to provide side- or bottom-dockable tool panels in the editor. IDEs like Visual Studio and Eclipse have had dock-like components for some time, but now Atom is adding such a component as a core element.

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